Pai Hsien Yung talks about Kunqu in SHKP Book Club seminar

21 Dec 2008


Sun Hung Kai Properties promotes reading in Hong Kong with its SHKP Book Club.  The Book Club and Up Publications and MGuru presented a public seminar today (December 21) with the highly respected Kenneth Pai Hsien Yung speaking on Kunqu (a variety of Chinese opera).  Over 400 people came to hear Professor Pai's insightful analysis of Kunqu and why he believes it is one of the best Chinese art forms.  Professor Pai is well known on the literary scene and highly acclaimed for his contributions to Chinese literature.  His seminar was the fourth presented by the Book Club this year. The previous seminars had sinologist Yu Dan and cultural commentators Leung man-tao and Lau Sai-leung talking on a range of reading-related topics.


The 'Professor Pai looks at Kunqu' seminar was part of the Book Club's continuing efforts to encourage learning and literature appreciation from different points of view.  It was held at W Hong Kong, where the audience of teachers, students and members of the public learned more about Chinese literature. Professor Pai started with three poems: A Spring Dawn, Evening Call of the Raven and Dream of the Red Chamber, to illustrate the love and melancholy for spring throughout the history of Chinese literature.  He then explained his revised version of the Peony Pavilion.  He showed the audience the essence of Kunqu by referring to the scene in Interrupted Dream prologue in which the young lover dreams of strolling in the gardens in spring.  There was a live Kunqu performance of one of the Peony Pavilion prologues.


Professor Pai founded Modern Literature magazine. His novels include Lonely Seventeen, Taipei People, Crystal Boys and more.  He developed passion for Kunqu at a young age.  His novel Wandering in the Garden, Waking from a Dream was inspired by the Peony Pavilion.  Professor Pai's passion for Kunqu has sustained a 20-year effort to promoting the art.  He recently began to focus on educating young people about Kunqu, giving public talks and working with young Kunqu artists in Hong Kong and Taiwan.  His version of the Peony Pavilion was staged in 2004 and proved a big inspiration for young people, making a significant contribution to continuing Chinese traditions.


The Book Club will continue presenting seminars with renowned scholars speaking on reading and related matters. Previously Book Club activities have included book review competitions, a young writers' debut competition, book recommendations, book fairs, writers workshops and publishing a free literary magazine, promoting reading in Hong Kong.

Pai Hsien Yung talks about Kunqu in SHKP Book Club seminar

21 Dec 2008





Sun Hung Kai Properties promotes reading in Hong Kong with its SHKP Book Club.  The Book Club and Up Publications and MGuru presented a public seminar today (December 21) with the highly respected Kenneth Pai Hsien Yung speaking on Kunqu (a variety of Chinese opera).  Over 400 people came to hear Professor Pai's insightful analysis of Kunqu and why he believes it is one of the best Chinese art forms.  Professor Pai is well known on the literary scene and highly acclaimed for his contributions to Chinese literature.  His seminar was the fourth presented by the Book Club this year. The previous seminars had sinologist Yu Dan and cultural commentators Leung man-tao and Lau Sai-leung talking on a range of reading-related topics.


The 'Professor Pai looks at Kunqu' seminar was part of the Book Club's continuing efforts to encourage learning and literature appreciation from different points of view.  It was held at W Hong Kong, where the audience of teachers, students and members of the public learned more about Chinese literature. Professor Pai started with three poems: A Spring Dawn, Evening Call of the Raven and Dream of the Red Chamber, to illustrate the love and melancholy for spring throughout the history of Chinese literature.  He then explained his revised version of the Peony Pavilion.  He showed the audience the essence of Kunqu by referring to the scene in Interrupted Dream prologue in which the young lover dreams of strolling in the gardens in spring.  There was a live Kunqu performance of one of the Peony Pavilion prologues.


Professor Pai founded Modern Literature magazine. His novels include Lonely Seventeen, Taipei People, Crystal Boys and more.  He developed passion for Kunqu at a young age.  His novel Wandering in the Garden, Waking from a Dream was inspired by the Peony Pavilion.  Professor Pai's passion for Kunqu has sustained a 20-year effort to promoting the art.  He recently began to focus on educating young people about Kunqu, giving public talks and working with young Kunqu artists in Hong Kong and Taiwan.  His version of the Peony Pavilion was staged in 2004 and proved a big inspiration for young people, making a significant contribution to continuing Chinese traditions.


The Book Club will continue presenting seminars with renowned scholars speaking on reading and related matters. Previously Book Club activities have included book review competitions, a young writers' debut competition, book recommendations, book fairs, writers workshops and publishing a free literary magazine, promoting reading in Hong Kong.