Hong Kong people monthly book spending higher than Taiwanese My Reading Index up, electronic books gaining popularity

08 Jul 2013


Sun Hung Kai Properties (SHKP) commissioned Powersoft Consultancy, an affiliate of the Roundtable Institute and Its Network, to conduct the second SHKP Reading Index survey on Hong Kong people’s reading habits, their views about reading and the overall reading culture.

The survey was carried out between 6 and 22 May 2013 via telephone interviews with 1,000 Hong Kong residents aged 15 and above selected at random. It revealed the My Reading Index is 5.1, higher than the 2012 result (4.81).

Print books are still the preferred choice (61.2%) among respondents but lower than last year (71.7%). The percentage of respondents who only read electronic books was 7.1%; more than double that in 2012 (3.2%). This shows that electronic books are more popular.

The index was announced to the media by Sun Hung Kai Properties Executive Director and Deputy Managing Director Mike Wong, supporting organization Hong Kong Trade Development Council Exhibitions Market Development Director Loretta Wan, The Chinese University of Hong Kong Faculty of Social Science Associate Professor Simon Shen and Powersoft Executive Director Gary Wong. They gave their views about the survey findings from different perspectives.

Mike Wong said: "We are very pleased to see the index showing Hong Kong people's interest in reading has increased gradually and there has been a growth in both the time spent on reading and the number of books read. SHKP did the first survey on reading habits last year in order to raise public awareness of the culture of reading in Hong Kong and encourage people to develop an interest in reading." 

"The report also reveals that respondents' opinions about the local reading culture correspond to the degree they agreed that the business sector can help promoting reading. This reinforces SHKP's long-term commitment to promoting reading through the SHKP Book Club. We will continue staging diverse activities to encourage people to embrace books to learn," Mr Wong added.

More people have a reading habit

Powersoft Consultancy said the My Reading Index is 5.10 – higher than 2012 – but the Index of Hong Kong Reading Culture is just fair (4.68). This shows that more respondents have a reading habit but they may not realize the overall changes in society as reading is an individual behaviour. The firm said it hoped that there would be more reading-related activities to get more people to read.

Respondents who spent an average 4.7 hours per week reading books and the average number of books read in last six months was 6. The average number of books read by those who only read electronic books was up from 2.3 last year to 3.3 this year. This shows that Hong Kong people now are more interested in reading than last year.

Business opportunities for electronic publishing

This year’s findings indicated that the percentage reading electronic books of respondents aged between 15 and 34 is 42.6%, higher among other age groups; meaning young people have a higher preference on electronic books. Most respondents thought that the genres of electronic books on the market were quite limited, so Powersoft suggests that publishers offer more choices to take advantage of the business opportunity associated with reading trends.

Hong Kong people spend more on average than Taiwanese

The average monthly amount spent on books by Hong Kong respondents who read was HK$120 − higher than Taiwanese according to the latest Taiwan Reading Survey that puts their annual book spending at TWD1,461 (about HK$384.5 or HK$32 per month).

Commercial sector and book fair effective in promoting reading

Findings indicate that respondents’ opinion about the local reading culture is highly correlated with their impression that the business sector can help promote reading. The book fair runs only seven days but it is one of the three main ways respondents acquire printed and new books, showing its importance in promote reading. Powersoft suggests that more efforts should be dedicated to promote book fairs.

About the SHKP Book Club

SHKP set up the Book Club in 2005 to get people into the habit of reading to broaden their knowledge and horizons and encourage self-improvement and life-long learning. The Club organizes reading-related activities such as book review competitions, Young Writers’ Debut competitions, the free Books4You magazine, public seminars and taking children to the book fair. Visit www.shkpbookclub.com for details.

About Powersoft Consultancy

Powersoft Consultancy is an affiliate of the Roundtable Institute and its Network. It aims to publicize methodology and analysis of social science research in daily practice. It provides innovative ideas and tailored solutions to address the different needs of clients. The team has a diverse and extensive social science research background, combining with the experience it gained over the years since it was founded. The Powersoft Way® research method is patented with the Intellectual Property Department of the HKSAR Government.
Hong Kong people monthly book spending higher than Taiwanese My Reading Index up, electronic books gaining popularity

08 Jul 2013



Sun Hung Kai Properties (SHKP) commissioned Powersoft Consultancy, an affiliate of the Roundtable Institute and Its Network, to conduct the second SHKP Reading Index survey on Hong Kong people’s reading habits, their views about reading and the overall reading culture.

The survey was carried out between 6 and 22 May 2013 via telephone interviews with 1,000 Hong Kong residents aged 15 and above selected at random. It revealed the My Reading Index is 5.1, higher than the 2012 result (4.81).

Print books are still the preferred choice (61.2%) among respondents but lower than last year (71.7%). The percentage of respondents who only read electronic books was 7.1%; more than double that in 2012 (3.2%). This shows that electronic books are more popular.

The index was announced to the media by Sun Hung Kai Properties Executive Director and Deputy Managing Director Mike Wong, supporting organization Hong Kong Trade Development Council Exhibitions Market Development Director Loretta Wan, The Chinese University of Hong Kong Faculty of Social Science Associate Professor Simon Shen and Powersoft Executive Director Gary Wong. They gave their views about the survey findings from different perspectives.

Mike Wong said: "We are very pleased to see the index showing Hong Kong people's interest in reading has increased gradually and there has been a growth in both the time spent on reading and the number of books read. SHKP did the first survey on reading habits last year in order to raise public awareness of the culture of reading in Hong Kong and encourage people to develop an interest in reading." 

"The report also reveals that respondents' opinions about the local reading culture correspond to the degree they agreed that the business sector can help promoting reading. This reinforces SHKP's long-term commitment to promoting reading through the SHKP Book Club. We will continue staging diverse activities to encourage people to embrace books to learn," Mr Wong added.

More people have a reading habit

Powersoft Consultancy said the My Reading Index is 5.10 – higher than 2012 – but the Index of Hong Kong Reading Culture is just fair (4.68). This shows that more respondents have a reading habit but they may not realize the overall changes in society as reading is an individual behaviour. The firm said it hoped that there would be more reading-related activities to get more people to read.

Respondents who spent an average 4.7 hours per week reading books and the average number of books read in last six months was 6. The average number of books read by those who only read electronic books was up from 2.3 last year to 3.3 this year. This shows that Hong Kong people now are more interested in reading than last year.

Business opportunities for electronic publishing

This year’s findings indicated that the percentage reading electronic books of respondents aged between 15 and 34 is 42.6%, higher among other age groups; meaning young people have a higher preference on electronic books. Most respondents thought that the genres of electronic books on the market were quite limited, so Powersoft suggests that publishers offer more choices to take advantage of the business opportunity associated with reading trends.

Hong Kong people spend more on average than Taiwanese

The average monthly amount spent on books by Hong Kong respondents who read was HK$120 − higher than Taiwanese according to the latest Taiwan Reading Survey that puts their annual book spending at TWD1,461 (about HK$384.5 or HK$32 per month).

Commercial sector and book fair effective in promoting reading

Findings indicate that respondents’ opinion about the local reading culture is highly correlated with their impression that the business sector can help promote reading. The book fair runs only seven days but it is one of the three main ways respondents acquire printed and new books, showing its importance in promote reading. Powersoft suggests that more efforts should be dedicated to promote book fairs.

About the SHKP Book Club

SHKP set up the Book Club in 2005 to get people into the habit of reading to broaden their knowledge and horizons and encourage self-improvement and life-long learning. The Club organizes reading-related activities such as book review competitions, Young Writers’ Debut competitions, the free Books4You magazine, public seminars and taking children to the book fair. Visit www.shkpbookclub.com for details.

About Powersoft Consultancy

Powersoft Consultancy is an affiliate of the Roundtable Institute and its Network. It aims to publicize methodology and analysis of social science research in daily practice. It provides innovative ideas and tailored solutions to address the different needs of clients. The team has a diverse and extensive social science research background, combining with the experience it gained over the years since it was founded. The Powersoft Way® research method is patented with the Intellectual Property Department of the HKSAR Government.